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When someone dies and their family successfully sues the party responsible for the death, the family may recover compensation for the loss of their family member. There are two possible avenues for the family to collect money: Wrongful Death and Survival Action. They are not the same. Read on to learn the difference.

Wrongful Death

Under the Pennsylvania Wrongful Death Act, the family of the deceased may collect:

         Past Lost Contributions. This is the amount that the family has lost between the time of the death to the present. It includes the money the deceased family member would have spent on or given to his family for things like food, clothing, medical care, education, and even gifts and recreation.

         Future Loss of Contributions. This is the amount of money that fairly compensates the family for the loss of future gifts the deceased family member would have given. In other words, the contributions the deceased family member would make from today until the deceased family member would have died had there been no negligence. For instance, if the deceased family member had a life expectancy of 85 years, you would calculate how many years until she would have reached the age of 85 and you would be compensated for the loss of her contributions for that period of time.

         Past and Future Noneconomic Damages. When someone dies, they can no longer give their family their companionship, emotional comfort, sense of humor, etc. The family can be compensated for the profound emotional and psychological loss of their treasured family member.

Survival Action

Under the Pennsylvania Survival Action, the family member of the deceased person can collect:

         Past Lost Earnings. If there is a period of time that took place between the time of the negligent act and the time of the death, the family is entitled to be paid for the amount the deceased person would have earned in damages between those two events: negligence and death.

         Future Loss of Earnings. This amount covers how much the deceased family member would have earned from today to his life expectancy, as explained above.

         Past Noneconomic Damages. When someone is injured as the result of someone’s negligence, they don’t always die immediately. Sometimes, they could suffer briefly and sometimes they could suffer for a prolonged amount of time before they die. Whatever length that period is, it can be a category of damages. The family of the deceased person can recover money for the mental and physical pain, suffering, and loss of life’s pleasures from the moment she’s injured to the moment of her death.

It is often the case that the family is entitled to both Wrongful Death and Survival Action damages. It is up to your experienced wrongful death lawyer to plead these claims and ensure that you get the most compensation for your loss. To speak with an experienced wrongful death attorney, contact VSCP Law.

In personal injury cases, you can seek emotional distress damages. The emotional distress damages you can claim, however, depend on whether you, yourself, are the injured party or whether you are claiming emotional damages due to the physical injury to your family member.

Emotional Damages for You, the Injured Party

When you are injured, you have multiple possible avenues for claiming emotional damages, including:

Pain and Suffering.  This damage category includes the physical discomfort, mental anxiety, emotional distress, and inconvenience that you’ve suffered  – and will continue to suffer – as a result of your injury.

Embarrassment and humiliation. This refers to any feelings of shame, inferiority, humiliation, or inadequacy that you feel and will continue to feel as a result of your injury. 

Disfigurement. This damage category includes scarring, deformity, limp, or another observable defect that you suffer – and might continue to suffer – as a result of your injury. 

Loss of ability to enjoy life’s pleasures. This refers to the past and future loss of your ability to participate in hobbies, games, sports, or other activity, that you previously enjoyed. The activities don’t have to be physical, like biking or rock-climbing. Activities could include chess or reading. If you can no longer do those activities due to your injury, you can claim emotional distress as the result of having to discontinue them.

Emotional Damages for You as a Family Member of the Injured Party

When it is not you who was personally physically injured, but your family member, you can still make a claim for emotional damages. The courts call these damages Negligent Infliction of Emotional Distress Damages and in order to prove this, you need to establish that the defendant’s negligence caused your loved one to suffer a physical injury and you have suffered emotional distress as a result. There are different types of liability that would lead to this level of compensation, including:

Zone of Danger Liability. You could recover damages if you were near the point of impact. For example, if you were in the car with your wife during the accident in which your wife was injured, you were within the zone of danger and would likely have a successful claim for emotional distress.

Bystander Liability. If you witnessed the physical harm caused to your loved one, you are considered a bystander. For example, if you were in the room when a nurse administered the wrong medicine to your child, causing your child to suffer serious immediate injuries, you were a bystander and could collect compensation for your emotional distress.

If you or your loved one suffered a personal injury, it’s important to work with a knowledgeable personal injury attorney who can help you collect the appropriate damages. Contact the experienced and knowledgeable personal injury lawyers at VSCP Law.

It can be devastating when you realize that your loved one’s death could have been prevented with proper medical care, or proper care in other settings, such as the workplace. If you believe your loved one has died as a result of the actions or omissions of their healthcare providers or other individuals, you may be able to file a wrongful death lawsuit. Read on to understand the various categories of wrongful death damages that you can recover.

Under Pennsylvania’s wrongful death statute, there are two main categories of compensation: economic and non-economic. Economic damages are quantifiable, meaning the exact figure can be established with documentation. Non-economic damages are not quantifiable – they are more of a subjective assessment of the sad consequences of an injury. Read on for the list of categories of compensation that your wrongful death lawyers in Philadelphia can win for you:

ECONOMIC

Lost wages. If your deceased loved one was working and earning wages at the time of their death, you may be able to recover lost wages – that is, the wages that your loved one can no longer earn, in addition to the value of work-related benefits.  

Medical expenses. This category of compensation is related to the bills from the hospital, doctors, physical therapist, pharmacy, and any other healthcare service or provider that are related to your loved one’s death.

Burial/funeral costs. Burial, funeral, and all costs related to interment may be compensated.

Estate administration costs. When someone dies, their property becomes an estate. The estate has to be administered which could include paying utilities, storage, monthly housing fees, and taxes related to the decedent’s property, as well as paying the person who is in charge of making all these payments from the estate.

Costs of living. These are the costs that the decedent would have spent to support their family members had they not died. These costs may include food, clothing, shelter, transportation, education, and recreation.

NON-ECONOMIC

Loss of companionship, comfort, and society. Sometimes referred to as “loss of consortium,” this describes the loss of the benefits of having someone in your life. For a spouse of the decedent, this may include the loss of companionship, cooperation, affection, comfort, services, assistance, sexual relations, and emotional support. For a parent of a child who died, this may include the loss of the opportunity to witness certain milestones like walking, talking, riding a bike, and playing sports. For the child of a parent who died, this may include the loss of the deceased parent’s guidance, training, advice, education, care, comfort, moral upbringing, and emotional support.  

Pain and suffering. This category refers to the physical and emotional pain and suffering that the decedent underwent after the negligent action and before their actual death. Some pain is obvious because it’s accompanied by moans, groans, and/or winces; other pain is invisible because it’s experienced internally, but it is no less significant.

It goes without saying that no amount of money will take away the sadness you feel when your loved one dies. But, with the right wrongful death attorney in Philadelphia, you can at least rest assured that you will get the most compensation possible for your case.

If you believe your loved one has died as the result of someone else’s actions or inactions, contact the wrongful death lawyers at VSCP Law.

The brain is arguably the most important organ in a person’s body because it controls bodily functions as well as cognitive processing. The brain, as with all organs, needs oxygen to thrive. When a baby’s brain is denied adequate levels of oxygen, the baby suffers brain damage. That brain damage can result in cerebral palsy, which impedes a person’s ability to perform cognitively, control bodily functions, control voluntary movements, maintain balance, and to move. The nomenclature derives from cerebral (having to do with the brain) and palsy (weakness or problems with muscles).   

Could cerebral palsy be caused by medical malpractice?

Yes, cerebral palsy can be caused by medical malpractice. In fact, there are various different forms of

medical malpractice that can lead to cerebral palsy.

Failure to detect dangerous hypoxia before, during, or after the birth. As mentioned

above, a baby’s brain needs oxygen to thrive. “Hypoxia” is when the brain does not receive adequate levels of oxygen. If a doctor fails to realize that the baby is experiencing hypoxia – or, if the doctor does realize it and fails to do anything to prevent the hypoxia through urgent delivery and/or other

resuscitative measures – that doctor has likely committed medical malpractice.

  Failure to detect (and timely treat) infections. Infections can range from mild to severe, but in

all cases of a baby suffering an infection, the doctor must detect it early in order to be able to properly administer antibiotics or other therapeutic medicine. If the doctor fails to timely diagnose and treat an infection, the baby could suffer brain damage and cerebral palsy and/or other brain injuries.

 Failure to perform timely Caesarean section where indicated. Sometimes a vaginal birth is not possible or safe and the baby is better off being delivered by Caesarean section (or c-section). A c-section is where the doctor strategically cuts the mother’s abdomen and uterus so as to remove the baby from the uterus. A c-section may be indicated where the mother has a medical condition that prevents her from safely delivering her baby vaginally. A c-section may also be indicated when the traditional labor methods aren’t working – the labor isn’t progressing fast enough, the baby is too large to leave the mother’s body vaginally, the umbilical cord is pinched, the umbilical cord is wrapped around the baby’s neck, the baby is in distress, etc. Medical malpractice can occur when c-section is indicated to keep the mother and baby healthy and safe, and the doctor fails to perform the c-section in a timely manner, or at all. 

 Negligently performing the delivery. There are many ways a doctor can commit medical malpractice during the childbirth process. They could use excessive force in extracting the baby from the uterus or from the vaginal canal, they could twist the baby’s body in a way that causes injury, they could misuse the various delivery tools (forceps, vacuum extractor, scissors, clamps, specula, etc.),

they could fail to properly monitor the baby’s heartbeat, etc. These are all examples of negligent delivery.

Whatever actions or inactions led to your baby’s cerebral palsy or brain injury, contact the medical malpractice lawyers at VSCP Law to discuss whether you have a valid claim for medical malpractice.

Medical malpractice can occur when the healthcare professional makes an inaccurate or delayed diagnosis, or when they fail to make a diagnosis at all. A diagnosis is the identification of a condition, disease, or injury from its signs, symptoms, or other information. Failure to properly diagnose, missed diagnosis, and failure to timely diagnose are three main incidences of medical malpractice in the context of diagnoses.

 

Misdiagnosis 

 

Healthcare providers often misdiagnose patients, which could lead to serious injury or death. One important example of this medical error is doctors’ frequent misdiagnoses of heart attacks in women. Because women experiencing heart attacks have symptoms that differ slightly from men’s heart attack symptoms, doctors often fail to recognize that a heart attack is indeed what the woman is suffering from. While men may often experience chest pain or numbness in their left arms when having a heart attack, women may experience nausea, stomach pain, or dizziness. Poorly-informed doctors misdiagnose women with menstrual cramps or indigestion rather than treating them urgently for the heart attacks they’re experiencing. Incorrectly diagnosing patients could be medical malpractice.

 

Missed Diagnosis

 

In the above example, the doctor gave the wrong diagnosis. In a case of missed diagnosis, the doctor fails to give any diagnosis at all. Suppose a person presents to the doctor with a bad cough and the doctor concludes that it was just a symptom of the flu that was going around and sends the person home with no diagnosis. The person in fact was coughing because of cancerous tumors in her lung. The doctor in that instance missed the diagnosis of lung cancer and such missed diagnosis can be due to medical malpractice.

 

Delayed Diagnosis

 

There are many medical conditions that require prompt intervention by healthcare professionals. For example, a stroke is when blood supply to the brain is interrupted or reduced. This is an urgent medical issue and requires a timely diagnosis. When the healthcare professional recognizes the signs of stroke and acts quickly, they can help restore blood flow to the brain. Failure to do so will lead to oxygen deprivation in the brain, which can lead to brain damage, disability, and even death. If a healthcare professional delays diagnosis of stroke and/or fails to act urgently, thereby delaying or withholding lifesaving treatment and disability-preventing treatment, they could be held liable for medical malpractice.

 

Misdiagnoses, missed diagnoses, and delayed diagnoses can result in serious injury or death. In these cases, patients or their loved ones should consult with a medical malpractice attorney, like the experienced practitioners at VSCP Law.

 

The brain is arguably the most important organ in a person’s body because it controls bodily functions as well as cognitive processing. The brain, as with all organs, needs oxygen to thrive. When a baby’s brain is denied adequate levels of oxygen, brain damage can occur. That brain damage can result in cerebral palsy, which impedes a person’s ability to perform cognitively, control bodily functions, control voluntary movements, maintain balance and to move. The nomenclature derives from cerebral (having to do with the brain) and palsy (weakness or problems with muscles).   

 

Can cerebral palsy be caused by medical malpractice?

 

Yes, cerebral palsy can be caused by medical malpractice. In fact, there are various different forms of medical malpractice that can lead to cerebral palsy.

 

         Failure to detect potential dangerous hypoxia before, during, or after the birth. As mentioned above, a baby’s brain needs oxygen to thrive. “Hypoxia” is when the brain does not receive adequate levels of oxygen. If a doctor fails to realize that the baby is experiencing potential hypoxia – or, if the doctor does realize it and fails to do anything to prevent the hypoxia through urgent delivery and/or other resuscitative measures – that doctor has likely committed medical malpractice.

 

         Failure to detect (and timely treat) infections. Infections can range from mild to severe, but in all cases of a baby suffering an infection, the doctor must detect it early in order to be able to properly administer antibiotics or other therapeutic medicine. If the doctor fails to timely diagnose and treat an infection, the baby could suffer brain damage and cerebral palsy and/or other brain injuries.

 

         Failure to perform caesarean section where indicated. Sometimes a vaginal birth is not possible or safe and the baby is better off being delivered by caesarean section (or c-section). A c-section is where the doctor strategically cuts the mother’s abdomen and uterus so as to remove the baby safely from the uterus. A c-section may be indicated where the mother has a medical condition that prevents her from safely delivering her baby vaginally. A c-section may also be indicated when the traditional labor methods aren’t working – the labor isn’t progressing fast enough, the baby is too large to leave the mother’s body vaginally, the umbilical cord is pinched, the umbilical cord is wrapped around the baby’s neck, the baby is in distress, etc. Medical malpractice can occur when c-section is indicated to keep the mother and baby healthy and safe, and the doctor fails to perform the c-section in a timely manner, or at all.

        

         Negligently performing the delivery. There are many ways a doctor can commit medical malpractice during the childbirth process. They could use excessive force in extracting the baby from the uterus or from the vaginal canal, they could twist the baby’s body in a way that causes injury, they could misuse the various delivery tools (forceps, vacuum extractor, scissors, clamps, specula, etc.), they could fail to properly monitor the baby’s heartbeat, etc.

 

Whatever actions or inactions led to your baby’s cerebral palsy or brain injury, contact the medical malpractice lawyers at VSCP Law to discuss whether you have a valid claim for medical malpractice.

Professional negligence describes what happens when a person who was hired for their specialized skill set fails to perform what they were hired by their client to do. Typically, professional negligence arises in the context of services by accountants, architects, financial advisors, and realtors. Another industry in which professional negligence cases arise is medicine.

Thus, medical malpractice is a type of professional negligence.

But medical malpractice is arguably not as straightforward as other industries in which professional negligence can occur. Below are some of the special requirements and rules that make medical malpractice more complicated than other instances of professional negligence.

NECESSARY ELEMENTS OF A MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CASE

In order to prove medical malpractice, you have to prove the following four necessary elements: duty, breach of duty, causation, and damages. Read this blog post (LINK TO POST RE 4 ELEMENTS OF MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIM) for a complete overview of each necessary element that your medical malpractice attorney has to prove.

DIFFERENT TYPES OF MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIMS

The most common types of medical malpractice claims include delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, failure to act urgently, and surgical errors. Read this blog post (LINK TO “What Kind Of Cases Does A Medical Malpractice Attorney Handle?” post) for a description of each claim.

CATEGORIES OF COMPENSATION IN MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIM

In a medical malpractice claim, your medical malpractice lawyer will fight to get you the highest compensation possible to help you regain your financial footing. Compensation is typically divided into “economic” (that is, quantifiable with documentation) or “non-economic” (that is, not quantifiable with documentation) damages. A third category, punitive damages, requires proof of malice and this is rarely applicable, although still possible, in medical malpractice claims. Economic damages include medical bills, pharmacy bills, and funeral costs. Non-economic damages include loss of the enjoyment of life, humiliation, and pain and suffering. For a more detailed overview of the categories of compensation, click here (LINK TO CATEGORIES OF COMPENSATION POST).

SPECIAL LAWS AND STATUTES THAT APPLY TO MEDICAL MALPRACTICE CLAIMS IN PENNSYLVANIA

*Statute of Limitations*

In the case of a surviving plaintiff, Pennsylvania law allows you two years from when you knew or should have known that your injury was the result of the defendants’ medical mistake.

In the case of a deceased party, Pennsylvania law allows their loved one two years from the official death date to file a wrongful death medical malpractice lawsuit.

*MCARE Act*

The Pennsylvania Medical Care Availability and Reduction of Error Fund (“MCARE”) Act requires that healthcare providers carry a minimum of $500,000 in liability insurance coverage per lawsuit. This ensures that victims of medical negligence can be reasonably compensated for their injuries. As part of the MCARE Act, there’s a special fund that pays claims in excess of the $500,000 in required coverage.

By way of example, let’s assume your medical malpractice attorney files a lawsuit against the doctor who treated you and the hospital where you received the treatment. Each party (the doctor and the hospital) are statutorily required to carry primary insurance for $500,000. On top of that, the MCARE fund can provide an additional $500,000 in recovery per provider. Unfortunately, the process of filing claims and working under the MCARE Act is not very straightforward and requires a medical malpractice lawyer who has vast experience in working under the MCARE Act.

To consult with attorneys who are experienced in the highly specialized area of medical malpractice law, contact VSCP LAW.

If you suffer an injury after being treated by a healthcare provider, how do you know whether you have a medical malpractice case in Pennsylvania? Here are five signs you may have one.

  1. YOUR DOCTOR’S ADMISSION

While it’s rare, healthcare providers do sometimes admit to having made a mistake in the treatment of their patients. If your doctor or other medical provider apologizes for their actions or omissions – or otherwise admits to having erred in their treatment of you — that’s an obvious sign that you may have a medical malpractice case.

  1. YOUR DOCTOR’S OBSERVATION THAT ANOTHER DOCTOR ERRED

More common than your doctor admitting an error in their treatment of you is when your doctor notices that a different doctor who treated you made a mistake. In other words, your current doctor is looking at your medical records and notices that a different doctor erred. For instance, your primary care doctor could see that your cardiologist ignored the warning signs of your heart attack. If your doctor thinks that a different doctor made a mistake in treating you, you should contact a medical malpractice lawyer in Philadelphia to discuss whether you have a medical malpractice case.

  1. UNEXPECTED OUTCOME FROM A PROCEDURE

While there are some risks to procedures and surgeries, often the first sign of a potential medical malpractice case is that there was an unanticipated outcome. For instance, let’s say you went to your doctor for a routine stent placement. The stent is intended to open up one of your arteries that was blocked. But when the doctor was inserting the stent, they punctured the artery, which caused internal bleeding or “hemorrhaging.” This hemorrhaging episode was an unexpected outcome of the stent procedure. If you suffer an injury that is not a normal risk to a procedure, you should contact a Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer to discuss the possibility of a medical malpractice case.

  1. DELAYED DIAGNOSIS

There are many medical conditions that require prompt intervention by healthcare professionals. If you do not receive that prompt intervention, you could suffer catastrophic consequences. For example, a stroke is when blood supply to the brain is interrupted or reduced. This is an urgent medical issue and requires a timely diagnosis. When the healthcare professional recognizes the signs of stroke and acts quickly, they can help restore blood flow to the brain. Failure to do so will lead to oxygen and nutrient deprivation in the brain, which can lead to brain damage, disability, and even death. If a healthcare professional delays diagnosis of stroke and/or fails to act urgently, thereby delaying or withholding lifesaving treatment and disability-preventing treatment, you may have a medical malpractice case.

  1. MISDIAGNOSIS

Healthcare providers often misdiagnose patients, which could lead to serious injury or death. Misdiagnoses can be based on ignorance of family history, race, or gender. For instance, a woman may present to an emergency room with nausea and stomach pain and the

emergency room team completely ignore the possibility that she may be suffering a heart attack. Because doctors only tend to know the signs of heart attack in men (weakness in the left arm, chest pain, etc.), they completely miss the different signs of heart attack in women. So, they’ll chalk up the stomach issues to menstrual cramps or indigestion; that error qualifies as a misdiagnosis. Misdiagnoses can be a sign that you may have a medical malpractice case.

Don’t ignore the signs of a medical malpractice case. To find out if you have one, contact the lawyers at VSCP LAW.

It is hard to prove medical malpractice for attorneys who do not routinely practice this highly specialized area of law. Medical malpractice is not simple and “cut and dry.” Rather, it’s very technical and, because it involves science and medicine, it can be extremely complicated. Here are some reasons medical malpractice is an area of law best left to experienced medical malpractice attorneys.

There are various types of medical malpractice claims including:

The above list describes what the doctor or other healthcare providers did wrong. (For more detailed information about each of the above claims, see .) So, there is a lot of variety in that list of common errors in the healthcare setting. But what about the variety of circumstances in which the healthcare providers can be negligent?

Here is a mere sampling of literally hundreds of different circumstances in which a healthcare provider can be negligent:

And while the variety of contexts in which a healthcare provider can make a medical mistake vary exponentially and the types of errors healthcare providers can make also vary, imagine how much more complicated it becomes when you consider the variety of victims. From babies to senior citizens and everyone in between – with their own variability of age, biological gender, genetic predisposition, comorbidities, previous illnesses, etc. – there is absolutely no one-size-fits-all approach to the handling of their medical malpractice claim. And your experienced medical malpractice lawyer in Philadelphia knows to treat every client as the individual person that they are.

Lastly, medical malpractice law involves heavy research into past practice of medicine. While it’s wonderful that the art and science of medicine are always advancing, a medical malpractice lawyer’s focus has to be somewhat historical in nature. Indeed, what was the standard of care in a certain area of medicine ten years ago might no longer be the standard of care now. But the medical malpractice attorney needs to evaluate the medical negligence claim from the perspective of the time of the injury. For example, if the medical malpractice took place in 2020, the case will focus on what the standard of care in 2020 was – not what the current standard of care is. In that way, the medical malpractice attorney must play the role of historian as well.

No one would doubt that the practice of medicine is specialized. Nor should one doubt how specialized the practice of medical malpractice law is. For that reason, it can be difficult to prove medical malpractice unless the attorney is experienced and willing to take on the many challenges and hurdles that accompany these highly complex cases.

To find an experienced medical malpractice attorney to evaluate your case, contact VSCP Law.

Let’s start with this inquiry: would you hire a math teacher to help your child learn how to play the piano? No! Just as there are specialists in education, so, too, are there specialists in law. Thus, for a medical malpractice lawsuit in Pennsylvania, you should hire a Pennsylvania medical malpractice lawyer. And not just anyone. You need to hire an experienced medical malpractice attorney. Here’s why.

YOU WILL BE ABLE TO FILE THE LAWSUIT AND YOU’LL BE ABLE TO RETAIN CRUCIAL EVIDENCE

In every medical malpractice case, time is of the essence. If your Philadelphia medical malpractice lawyer does not act efficiently and swiftly, critical information could be permanently lost or worse: You could lose the opportunity to file a lawsuit at all! You need to hire an experienced attorney who appreciates the time-sensitive nature of your medical malpractice claim.

Statute of Limitations

Pennsylvania law allows you two years from when you knew or should have known that your injury was the result of the defendants’ medical mistake. In the case of a deceased party, Pennsylvania law allows you two years from the official death date to file a wrongful death medical malpractice lawsuit. Again, if you miss this crucial deadline, you lose the right to file a lawsuit.

Retaining Critical Evidence

An experienced medical malpractice attorney knows what actions must be taken early in the process such as ordering medical records including hospital intake forms, nurses’ logs, doctors’ notes, lab results, diagnostic orders and test results, etc.

Other examples of evidence that needs to be gathered in a timely fashion include witness statements, photographs and videos, and physical objects that are related to the medical malpractice claim such as prescription bottles and medical devices.

The presence or absence of these crucial forms of evidence could dictate whether your lawsuit is successful or not.

YOUR LIKELIHOOD OF SUCCESS IS INCREASED SUBSTANTIALLY

Despite aggressive advertising to the contrary, many attorneys do not actually have experience working on medical malpractice cases. Many law firms list “medical malpractice” on their websites because they want people to come to them with medical malpractice cases, but they don’t actually have any significant experience trying these types of complicated cases. Make sure you find a personal injury who practices the very specialized medical malpractice area of law.

YOUR COMPLAINT WILL INCLUDE ALL NECESSARY CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION

An experienced medical malpractice attorney evaluates the case with knowledge of all possible causes of action and claims for damages. For example, here are the various forms of compensation you can collect in a medical malpractice case in the context of a birth injury. Also, there are special statutes in Pennsylvania that apply to certain cases. An experienced medical malpractice attorney knows which statutes apply to your case and how to craft your claim in the way that puts you in the best position to win.

If you believe you or a loved one has been injured as the result of a medical error, contact the experienced medical malpractice specialists at VSCP Law.